BACKGROUND: Adverse drug reactions are important determinants of non-adherence to antidepressant treatment, but their assessment is complicated by overlap with depressive symptoms and lack of reliable self-report measures. AIMS: To evaluate a simple self-report measure and describe adverse reactions to antidepressants in a large sample. METHOD: The newly developed self-report Antidepressant Side-Effect Checklist and the psychiatrist-rated UKU Side Effect Rating Scale were repeatedly administered to 811 adult participants with depression in a part-randomised multicentre open-label study comparing escitalopram and nortriptyline. RESULTS: There was good agreement between self-report and psychiatrists' ratings. Most complaints listed as adverse reactions in people with depression were more common when they were medication-free rather than during their treatment with antidepressants. Dry mouth (74%), constipation (33%) and weight gain (15%) were associated with nortriptyline treatment. Diarrhoea (9%), insomnia (36%) and yawning (16%) were more common during treatment with escitalopram. Problems with urination and drowsiness predicted discontinuation of nortriptyline. Diarrhoea and decreased appetite predicted discontinuation of escitalopram. CONCLUSIONS: Adverse reactions to antidepressants can be reliably assessed by self-report. Attention to specific adverse reactions may improve adherence to antidepressant treatment.

Uher, R., Farmer, A., Henigsberg, N., Rietschel, M., Mors, O., Maier, W., et al. (2009). Adverse reactions to antidepressants. BRITISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY, 195, 202-210 [10.1192/bjp.bp.108.061960].

Adverse reactions to antidepressants

GIOVANNINI, CATERINA;
2009

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Adverse drug reactions are important determinants of non-adherence to antidepressant treatment, but their assessment is complicated by overlap with depressive symptoms and lack of reliable self-report measures. AIMS: To evaluate a simple self-report measure and describe adverse reactions to antidepressants in a large sample. METHOD: The newly developed self-report Antidepressant Side-Effect Checklist and the psychiatrist-rated UKU Side Effect Rating Scale were repeatedly administered to 811 adult participants with depression in a part-randomised multicentre open-label study comparing escitalopram and nortriptyline. RESULTS: There was good agreement between self-report and psychiatrists' ratings. Most complaints listed as adverse reactions in people with depression were more common when they were medication-free rather than during their treatment with antidepressants. Dry mouth (74%), constipation (33%) and weight gain (15%) were associated with nortriptyline treatment. Diarrhoea (9%), insomnia (36%) and yawning (16%) were more common during treatment with escitalopram. Problems with urination and drowsiness predicted discontinuation of nortriptyline. Diarrhoea and decreased appetite predicted discontinuation of escitalopram. CONCLUSIONS: Adverse reactions to antidepressants can be reliably assessed by self-report. Attention to specific adverse reactions may improve adherence to antidepressant treatment.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
antidepressants, adverse reactions, adherence
English
2009
195
202
210
none
Uher, R., Farmer, A., Henigsberg, N., Rietschel, M., Mors, O., Maier, W., et al. (2009). Adverse reactions to antidepressants. BRITISH JOURNAL OF PSYCHIATRY, 195, 202-210 [10.1192/bjp.bp.108.061960].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/17234
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