Antithrombin (AT) is a 65 kDa glycoprotein belonging to a group of inhibitory factors known as serpins (serine protease inhibitors). It plays a critical role in the inhibition of coagulation and inflammation processes within the environment of the vascular endothelium. Inadequate levels of functional AT in plasma results in an increased risk of thrombotic events, both venous and arterial. AT deficiency can be inherited or acquired. Congenital AT deficiency is the most severe inherited thrombophilic condition with an odds ratio of 20 for the increased risk of venous thrombosis. Acquired AT deficiency occurs in a variety of physiologic and pathologic medical conditions with similar risks of increased thrombosis. In this article, we review clinical settings characterized by an acquired AT deficiency largely or partly subsequent to protein microvascular leakage. Other different mechanisms of AT depletion are implied in some clinical conditions together with endothelial loss, and, therefore, outlined. In addition, we provide a description of the current knowledge on the specific mechanisms underlying endothelial AT leakage and on the consequences of this protein decrease, specifically looking at thrombosis. We identify potential directions of research that might prove useful in patients with acquired AT deficiency. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved

Ornaghi, S., Barnhart, K., Frieling, J., Streisand, J., Paidas, M. (2014). Clinical syndromes associated with acquired antithrombin deficiency via microvascular leakage and the related risk of thrombosis. THROMBOSIS RESEARCH, 133(6), 972-984 [10.1016/j.thromres.2014.02.014].

Clinical syndromes associated with acquired antithrombin deficiency via microvascular leakage and the related risk of thrombosis

ORNAGHI, SARA
Primo
;
2014

Abstract

Antithrombin (AT) is a 65 kDa glycoprotein belonging to a group of inhibitory factors known as serpins (serine protease inhibitors). It plays a critical role in the inhibition of coagulation and inflammation processes within the environment of the vascular endothelium. Inadequate levels of functional AT in plasma results in an increased risk of thrombotic events, both venous and arterial. AT deficiency can be inherited or acquired. Congenital AT deficiency is the most severe inherited thrombophilic condition with an odds ratio of 20 for the increased risk of venous thrombosis. Acquired AT deficiency occurs in a variety of physiologic and pathologic medical conditions with similar risks of increased thrombosis. In this article, we review clinical settings characterized by an acquired AT deficiency largely or partly subsequent to protein microvascular leakage. Other different mechanisms of AT depletion are implied in some clinical conditions together with endothelial loss, and, therefore, outlined. In addition, we provide a description of the current knowledge on the specific mechanisms underlying endothelial AT leakage and on the consequences of this protein decrease, specifically looking at thrombosis. We identify potential directions of research that might prove useful in patients with acquired AT deficiency. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved
Recensione in rivista
Antithrombin; Coagulation; Inflammation; Thrombosis; Vascular permeability; Antithrombin III Deficiency; Blood Coagulation; Humans; Syndrome; Thrombosis; Hematology; Medicine (all)
English
972
984
13
Ornaghi, S., Barnhart, K., Frieling, J., Streisand, J., Paidas, M. (2014). Clinical syndromes associated with acquired antithrombin deficiency via microvascular leakage and the related risk of thrombosis. THROMBOSIS RESEARCH, 133(6), 972-984 [10.1016/j.thromres.2014.02.014].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/157354
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