The study examined the social skills of 92 Russian children (males = 64) adopted by Italian families. The children, aged between 8 and 14 years, were compared with a control group of children who grew up with the biological family. Evaluation by both parents and children of the children's social competence were investigated. The results showed that, according to the parents' reports, the adopted children had more problems in social functioning than peers in the control group, along with a greater propensity to use maladaptive behaviors such as Oppositive Behavior, Rule-Breaking Behavior, Aggressive Behavior and Externalization. By contrast, according to the children's assessments, the adopted children were less aggressive and used prosocial behaviors to a greater extent than children raised in the biological family. The views of the parents and the children about the children's aggressive behavior were mutually conflicting. Finally, the influence of adoption related variables on the social competence of children was examined. Contrary to our expectations, there were no significant relationships between social competence and age of adoption, the duration of institutionalization and the time spent in the adoptive family.

Caprin, C., Benedan, L., Ballarin, L., Gallace, A. (2017). Social competence in Russian post-institutionalized children: A comparison of adopted and non-adopted children. CHILDREN AND YOUTH SERVICES REVIEW, 75, 61-68 [10.1016/j.childyouth.2017.02.020].

Social competence in Russian post-institutionalized children: A comparison of adopted and non-adopted children

CAPRIN, CLAUDIA
Primo
;
BENEDAN, LAURA
Secondo
;
2017

Abstract

The study examined the social skills of 92 Russian children (males = 64) adopted by Italian families. The children, aged between 8 and 14 years, were compared with a control group of children who grew up with the biological family. Evaluation by both parents and children of the children's social competence were investigated. The results showed that, according to the parents' reports, the adopted children had more problems in social functioning than peers in the control group, along with a greater propensity to use maladaptive behaviors such as Oppositive Behavior, Rule-Breaking Behavior, Aggressive Behavior and Externalization. By contrast, according to the children's assessments, the adopted children were less aggressive and used prosocial behaviors to a greater extent than children raised in the biological family. The views of the parents and the children about the children's aggressive behavior were mutually conflicting. Finally, the influence of adoption related variables on the social competence of children was examined. Contrary to our expectations, there were no significant relationships between social competence and age of adoption, the duration of institutionalization and the time spent in the adoptive family.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Aggressive behavior; International adoption; Post-institutionalized children; Prosocial behavior; Social competence; Social maladjustment;
English
61
68
8
Caprin, C., Benedan, L., Ballarin, L., Gallace, A. (2017). Social competence in Russian post-institutionalized children: A comparison of adopted and non-adopted children. CHILDREN AND YOUTH SERVICES REVIEW, 75, 61-68 [10.1016/j.childyouth.2017.02.020].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/152253
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