Contemporary urban areas are characterized by the growing number of resident and non-resident people living, working, and consuming in cities. According to the analysis of Martinotti (1993), we have four types of metropolitan populations: inhabitants, commuters, city users (mainly tourists), and businessmen. These populations come and stay in the city in different moments during the day or in different seasons, for different reasons and purposes, generating different types of real or potential conflicts. In particular, it is possible to focus on six types of possible conflicts: from a spatial point of view, in terms of conflicts concerning occupation and mobility in the space; from a more general point of view, in terms of economic, cultural, fiscal, and political conflicts. Of course, non-resident populations constitute very important resources also for improving the living conditions of resident populations, and vice versa. However, scholars and planners should also recognize that contemporary cities have to tackle many problems related to the high concentration and flow of people in urban areas, where new worrisome phenomena of social polarization and political disenfranchisement are emerging that require innovative types of public policies.

Nuvolati, G. (2016). Resident and non-resident populations: Types of conflicts. In P. Pucci, M. Colleoni (a cura di), Understanding Mobilities for Designing Contemporary Cities (pp. 191-203). Springer [10.1007/978-3-319-22578-4_11].

Resident and non-resident populations: Types of conflicts

NUVOLATI, GIAMPAOLO
Primo
2016

Abstract

Contemporary urban areas are characterized by the growing number of resident and non-resident people living, working, and consuming in cities. According to the analysis of Martinotti (1993), we have four types of metropolitan populations: inhabitants, commuters, city users (mainly tourists), and businessmen. These populations come and stay in the city in different moments during the day or in different seasons, for different reasons and purposes, generating different types of real or potential conflicts. In particular, it is possible to focus on six types of possible conflicts: from a spatial point of view, in terms of conflicts concerning occupation and mobility in the space; from a more general point of view, in terms of economic, cultural, fiscal, and political conflicts. Of course, non-resident populations constitute very important resources also for improving the living conditions of resident populations, and vice versa. However, scholars and planners should also recognize that contemporary cities have to tackle many problems related to the high concentration and flow of people in urban areas, where new worrisome phenomena of social polarization and political disenfranchisement are emerging that require innovative types of public policies.
Capitolo o saggio
Urban mobility, Urban conflicts, Resident populations, Commuters, City users, Tourists
English
Understanding Mobilities for Designing Contemporary Cities
978-3-319-22577-7
Nuvolati, G. (2016). Resident and non-resident populations: Types of conflicts. In P. Pucci, M. Colleoni (a cura di), Understanding Mobilities for Designing Contemporary Cities (pp. 191-203). Springer [10.1007/978-3-319-22578-4_11].
Nuvolati, G
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/146888
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