Purpose of review: Lower respiratory tract infections remain one of the leading causes of death in the world. Recently, the introduction of molecular methods based on DNA sequencing and microarrays for the identification of nonculturable microorganisms and subspecies variations has challenged the previous 'one bug - one disease' paradigm, providing us with a broader view on human microbial communities and their role in the development of infectious diseases. The purpose of this review is to describe recent understanding of the role of microbiome and bacterial biofilm in the development of lung infections, and, at the same time, to present new areas of research opportunities. Recent findings: The review describes recent literature in cystic fibrosis patients, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, and literature in mechanically ventilated patients that helped to elucidate the role of microbiome and biofilm formation in the development of pneumonia. Summary: The characterization of the human microbiome and biofilms has changed our understanding of lower respiratory tract infections. More comprehensive, sensitive, and fast methods for bacterial, fungal, and viral detection are warranted to establish the colonization of the lower respiratory tract in healthy individuals and sick patients. Future research might explore the global bacterial, fungal, and viral pulmonary ecosystems and their interdependence to target novel preventive approaches and therapeutic strategies in chronic and acute lung infections.

Pirrone, M., Pinciroli, R., Berra, L. (2016). Microbiome, biofilms, and pneumonia in the ICU. CURRENT OPINION IN INFECTIOUS DISEASES, 29(2), 160-166 [10.1097/QCO.0000000000000255].

Microbiome, biofilms, and pneumonia in the ICU

PINCIROLI, RICCARDO
Secondo
;
BERRA, LORENZO
2016

Abstract

Purpose of review: Lower respiratory tract infections remain one of the leading causes of death in the world. Recently, the introduction of molecular methods based on DNA sequencing and microarrays for the identification of nonculturable microorganisms and subspecies variations has challenged the previous 'one bug - one disease' paradigm, providing us with a broader view on human microbial communities and their role in the development of infectious diseases. The purpose of this review is to describe recent understanding of the role of microbiome and bacterial biofilm in the development of lung infections, and, at the same time, to present new areas of research opportunities. Recent findings: The review describes recent literature in cystic fibrosis patients, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients, and literature in mechanically ventilated patients that helped to elucidate the role of microbiome and biofilm formation in the development of pneumonia. Summary: The characterization of the human microbiome and biofilms has changed our understanding of lower respiratory tract infections. More comprehensive, sensitive, and fast methods for bacterial, fungal, and viral detection are warranted to establish the colonization of the lower respiratory tract in healthy individuals and sick patients. Future research might explore the global bacterial, fungal, and viral pulmonary ecosystems and their interdependence to target novel preventive approaches and therapeutic strategies in chronic and acute lung infections.
Articolo in rivista - Review Essay
Biofilms; Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease; Cystic fibrosis; Microbiome; Pneumonia; Biofilms; Cystic Fibrosis; Humans; Pneumonia; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive; Respiration, Artificial; Intensive Care Units; Microbiota; Microbiology (medical); Infectious Diseases
English
160
166
7
Pirrone, M., Pinciroli, R., Berra, L. (2016). Microbiome, biofilms, and pneumonia in the ICU. CURRENT OPINION IN INFECTIOUS DISEASES, 29(2), 160-166 [10.1097/QCO.0000000000000255].
Pirrone, M; Pinciroli, R; Berra, L
File in questo prodotto:
Non ci sono file associati a questo prodotto.

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/146704
Citazioni
  • Scopus 15
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 15
Social impact