Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) may represent the clinical onset of malignancies or complicate their course, also in phase of quiescence. In literature, there are several case reports on the association between CVT and tumors, but there are few articles on its clinical characteristics in cancer patients (Pts). Our aim was to analyze the clinical characteristics of CVT associated with extracranial tumors. We identified nine cases of CVT in adults affected by extracranial tumors in 6 years from six hospitals. The median age was 40 years; eight Pts were female. Associated tumors were: lymphoma (4/9); breast (2/9), rhinopharynges (1/9) and gastric (1/9) carcinomas. One patient presented a kidney tumor and a melanoma at the same time. Multiple sinuses were affected in seven Pts. MRI showed parenchymal lesions in most cases (7/9). Clinical manifestations were: focal deficits (7/9), headache (6/9), early seizures (4/9) and consciousness disorders (3/9). Headache was the onset symptom in six Pts. In four of these Pts, headache preceded the onset of the focal deficit and/or seizures than 2-15 days. The characteristics of the headache were variable in intensity, location and type but all the Pts agreed in saying that it was an unusual headache, unresponsive to common pain medications. Five of the six Pts complaining of headache in the course of CVT presented focal deficits and parenchymal lesions at admission to the emergency room. All nine Pts were anticoagulated without further haemorrhagic complications. At discharge, the Pts presented a complete recovery in four cases, mild sequelae in four and moderate sequelae in one. In conclusion, we would like to underline the importance of particular care to cancer Pts complaining of headache, since the early diagnosis and the appropriate anticoagulant treatment could prevent the appearance of parenchymal lesions and the consequent neurological deficits. Also in the cases of normal brain CT, a brain MRI/MR venography should be performed in emergency setting if CVT is suspected.

Iurlaro, S., Silvani, A., Mauri, M., Truci, G., Beretta, S., Zilioli, A., et al. (2015). Headache in cerebral venous thrombosis associated with extracranial tumors: a clinical series. NEUROLOGICAL SCIENCES, 36(S1), 149-151 [10.1007/s10072-015-2174-5].

Headache in cerebral venous thrombosis associated with extracranial tumors: a clinical series

MAURI, MARIO;FERRARESE, CARLO;RIVA, MARTA
Ultimo
2015

Abstract

Cerebral venous thrombosis (CVT) may represent the clinical onset of malignancies or complicate their course, also in phase of quiescence. In literature, there are several case reports on the association between CVT and tumors, but there are few articles on its clinical characteristics in cancer patients (Pts). Our aim was to analyze the clinical characteristics of CVT associated with extracranial tumors. We identified nine cases of CVT in adults affected by extracranial tumors in 6 years from six hospitals. The median age was 40 years; eight Pts were female. Associated tumors were: lymphoma (4/9); breast (2/9), rhinopharynges (1/9) and gastric (1/9) carcinomas. One patient presented a kidney tumor and a melanoma at the same time. Multiple sinuses were affected in seven Pts. MRI showed parenchymal lesions in most cases (7/9). Clinical manifestations were: focal deficits (7/9), headache (6/9), early seizures (4/9) and consciousness disorders (3/9). Headache was the onset symptom in six Pts. In four of these Pts, headache preceded the onset of the focal deficit and/or seizures than 2-15 days. The characteristics of the headache were variable in intensity, location and type but all the Pts agreed in saying that it was an unusual headache, unresponsive to common pain medications. Five of the six Pts complaining of headache in the course of CVT presented focal deficits and parenchymal lesions at admission to the emergency room. All nine Pts were anticoagulated without further haemorrhagic complications. At discharge, the Pts presented a complete recovery in four cases, mild sequelae in four and moderate sequelae in one. In conclusion, we would like to underline the importance of particular care to cancer Pts complaining of headache, since the early diagnosis and the appropriate anticoagulant treatment could prevent the appearance of parenchymal lesions and the consequent neurological deficits. Also in the cases of normal brain CT, a brain MRI/MR venography should be performed in emergency setting if CVT is suspected.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Cancer; Cerebral venous thrombosis; Headache; Adult; Aged; Female; Headache; Humans; Intracranial Thrombosis; Male; Middle Aged; Neoplasms; Young Adult; Neurology (clinical); Psychiatry and Mental Health; 2708; Medicine (all)
English
149
151
3
Iurlaro, S., Silvani, A., Mauri, M., Truci, G., Beretta, S., Zilioli, A., et al. (2015). Headache in cerebral venous thrombosis associated with extracranial tumors: a clinical series. NEUROLOGICAL SCIENCES, 36(S1), 149-151 [10.1007/s10072-015-2174-5].
Iurlaro, S; Silvani, A; Mauri, M; Truci, G; Beretta, S; Zilioli, A; Guidotti, M; Salmaggi, A; Ferrarese, C; Comi, G; Riva, M
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/141120
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