Recently in the international context the type and the extent of sustainability information disclosed by organizations to shareholders, potential investors and other stakeholders can produce a relevant positive impact on several internal and external factors and determinants within companies (Cooper and Owen, 2007; Holder-Webb et al., 2009). The development of sustainability reporting as well as the boost of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) practices (FEE, 2008; KPMG, 2008, 2013; CR Perspectives 2013. Global CR Reporting Trends and Stakeholder Views, November 2013; Eurosif and ACCA, 2013; ACCA, 2015) should not be seen as a concern isolated from the main organizational performance (Cheng et al., 2015) or as a mere operation of impression management (Hooghiemstra, 2000; Merck-Davies and Brennan, 2007; Melloni, 2015) or an activity of “greenwashing” (Lyon and Mawell, 2011) but as a part of the value-driving initiatives and management processes of organizations (Eccles and Krzus, 2010; Eccles et al., 2014). Taking into account the lack of standardized sustainability reporting standards and hence the relevant differences among various industries and countries, there is a strong need to recognize the best practices about the three “Pillars” of sustainability factors, i.e. Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) issues. Recent collapses, corporate frauds and the crisis of investors’ confidence moved toward the development of ethical codes and the companies’ orientation to a more sustainable corporate governance model that is building up all over the world. The 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) achieved an unprecedented agreement on limiting global warming and a key milestone in the global shift towards a better and more comprehensive nonfinancial corporate reporting about companies’ exposure to climate change for investors, credit rating agencies, insurers, and other users of Annual Reports (McInerney, Johannsdottir, 2016). Given these premises, this research aims to investigate the relationships between corporate governance features and practices at different levels (ownership, board and management) on firm environmental performance. The empirical analysis is focused on a sample of listed companies on the major stock markets in a worldwide perspective (Western and Eastern Europe, USA, emerging economies, Australia, etc.) by Bloomberg database. The data collection covers the period 2011-2015 and follows by authoritative secondary sources (Bloomberg, 2015). This study uses a multi-theoretical framework through the combination of three theories: legitimacy theory, stakeholder theory and resource-based view (RBV) theory in order to support our research hypotheses

Corvino, A., Bianchi Martini, S., Doni, F. (2016). Investigating the linkage between corporate governance practices and environmental performance empirical evidence from an international perspective. In 13th workshop on corporate governance (pp.1-4). Brussels : European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management EIASM.

Investigating the linkage between corporate governance practices and environmental performance empirical evidence from an international perspective

DONI, FEDERICA
Ultimo
2016

Abstract

Recently in the international context the type and the extent of sustainability information disclosed by organizations to shareholders, potential investors and other stakeholders can produce a relevant positive impact on several internal and external factors and determinants within companies (Cooper and Owen, 2007; Holder-Webb et al., 2009). The development of sustainability reporting as well as the boost of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) practices (FEE, 2008; KPMG, 2008, 2013; CR Perspectives 2013. Global CR Reporting Trends and Stakeholder Views, November 2013; Eurosif and ACCA, 2013; ACCA, 2015) should not be seen as a concern isolated from the main organizational performance (Cheng et al., 2015) or as a mere operation of impression management (Hooghiemstra, 2000; Merck-Davies and Brennan, 2007; Melloni, 2015) or an activity of “greenwashing” (Lyon and Mawell, 2011) but as a part of the value-driving initiatives and management processes of organizations (Eccles and Krzus, 2010; Eccles et al., 2014). Taking into account the lack of standardized sustainability reporting standards and hence the relevant differences among various industries and countries, there is a strong need to recognize the best practices about the three “Pillars” of sustainability factors, i.e. Environmental, Social and Governance (ESG) issues. Recent collapses, corporate frauds and the crisis of investors’ confidence moved toward the development of ethical codes and the companies’ orientation to a more sustainable corporate governance model that is building up all over the world. The 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) achieved an unprecedented agreement on limiting global warming and a key milestone in the global shift towards a better and more comprehensive nonfinancial corporate reporting about companies’ exposure to climate change for investors, credit rating agencies, insurers, and other users of Annual Reports (McInerney, Johannsdottir, 2016). Given these premises, this research aims to investigate the relationships between corporate governance features and practices at different levels (ownership, board and management) on firm environmental performance. The empirical analysis is focused on a sample of listed companies on the major stock markets in a worldwide perspective (Western and Eastern Europe, USA, emerging economies, Australia, etc.) by Bloomberg database. The data collection covers the period 2011-2015 and follows by authoritative secondary sources (Bloomberg, 2015). This study uses a multi-theoretical framework through the combination of three theories: legitimacy theory, stakeholder theory and resource-based view (RBV) theory in order to support our research hypotheses
No
slide + paper
corporate governance practices, CSR, environmental performance, board, governance score, industry, financial markets, international perspective.
English
EIASM Workshop on Corporate Governance October 27-28
Corvino, A., Bianchi Martini, S., Doni, F. (2016). Investigating the linkage between corporate governance practices and environmental performance empirical evidence from an international perspective. In 13th workshop on corporate governance (pp.1-4). Brussels : European Institute for Advanced Studies in Management EIASM.
Corvino, A; Bianchi Martini, S; Doni, F
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/138869
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