This paper analyses elemental (EC), organic (OC) and total carbon (TC) concentration in PM2.5 and PM10 samples collected over the last few years within several national and European projects at 37 remote, rural, urban, and traffic sites across the Italian peninsula.The purpose of the study is to obtain a picture of the spatial and seasonal variability of these aerosol species in Italy, and an insight into sources, processes and effects of meteorological conditions.OC and EC showed winter maxima and summer minima at urban and rural locations and an opposite behaviour at remote high altitude sites, where they increase during the warm period due to the rising of the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL). The seasonal averages of OC are higher during winter compared to summer at the rural sites in the Po Valley (from 1.4 to 3.5 times), opposite to what usually occurs at rural locations, where OC increases during the warm period. This denotes the marked influence of urban areas on the surrounding rural environment in this densely populated region.The different types of sites exhibit marked differences in the average concentrations of carbonaceous aerosol and OC/EC ratio. This ratio is less sensitive to atmospheric processing than OC and EC concentrations, and hence more representative of different source types. Remote locations are characterised by the lowest levels of OC and especially EC, with OC/EC ratios ranging from 13 to 20, while the maximum OC and EC concentrations are observed at road-traffic influenced urban sites, where the OC/EC ratio ranges between 1 and 3. The highest urban impacts of OC and EC relative to remote and rural background sites occur in the Po Valley, especially in the city of Milan, which has the highest concentrations of PM and TC and low values of the OC/EC ratio. •We compared OC and EC data from different sites across the Italian Peninsula.•OC and EC concentration maxima occur during winter and minima during summer at all except remote sites.•Higher OC levels characterize the Po Valley compared to the rest of Italy both during summer and winter.•Biomass burning for residential heating strongly affects winter OC concentrations in the Po Valley.•Carbonaceous matter contribution to PM2.5 ranges between 37% at rural and 47% at traffic sites, on an annual basis

Sandrini S, Fuzzi S, Piazzalunga A, Prati P, Bonasoni P, Cavalli F, et al. (2014). Spatial and seasonal variability of carbonaceous aerosol across Italy. ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT, 99, 587-598 [10.1016/j.atmosenv.2014.10.032].

Spatial and seasonal variability of carbonaceous aerosol across Italy

PIAZZALUNGA, ANDREA;FERRERO, LUCA;PERRONE, MARIA GRAZIA;
2014

Abstract

This paper analyses elemental (EC), organic (OC) and total carbon (TC) concentration in PM2.5 and PM10 samples collected over the last few years within several national and European projects at 37 remote, rural, urban, and traffic sites across the Italian peninsula.The purpose of the study is to obtain a picture of the spatial and seasonal variability of these aerosol species in Italy, and an insight into sources, processes and effects of meteorological conditions.OC and EC showed winter maxima and summer minima at urban and rural locations and an opposite behaviour at remote high altitude sites, where they increase during the warm period due to the rising of the Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL). The seasonal averages of OC are higher during winter compared to summer at the rural sites in the Po Valley (from 1.4 to 3.5 times), opposite to what usually occurs at rural locations, where OC increases during the warm period. This denotes the marked influence of urban areas on the surrounding rural environment in this densely populated region.The different types of sites exhibit marked differences in the average concentrations of carbonaceous aerosol and OC/EC ratio. This ratio is less sensitive to atmospheric processing than OC and EC concentrations, and hence more representative of different source types. Remote locations are characterised by the lowest levels of OC and especially EC, with OC/EC ratios ranging from 13 to 20, while the maximum OC and EC concentrations are observed at road-traffic influenced urban sites, where the OC/EC ratio ranges between 1 and 3. The highest urban impacts of OC and EC relative to remote and rural background sites occur in the Po Valley, especially in the city of Milan, which has the highest concentrations of PM and TC and low values of the OC/EC ratio. •We compared OC and EC data from different sites across the Italian Peninsula.•OC and EC concentration maxima occur during winter and minima during summer at all except remote sites.•Higher OC levels characterize the Po Valley compared to the rest of Italy both during summer and winter.•Biomass burning for residential heating strongly affects winter OC concentrations in the Po Valley.•Carbonaceous matter contribution to PM2.5 ranges between 37% at rural and 47% at traffic sites, on an annual basis
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Elemental carbon; OC/EC ratio; Organic carbon; Particulate matter; SOA
English
587
598
12
Sandrini S, Fuzzi S, Piazzalunga A, Prati P, Bonasoni P, Cavalli F, et al. (2014). Spatial and seasonal variability of carbonaceous aerosol across Italy. ATMOSPHERIC ENVIRONMENT, 99, 587-598 [10.1016/j.atmosenv.2014.10.032].
Sandrini, S; Fuzzi, S; Piazzalunga, A; Prati, P; Bonasoni, P; Cavalli, F; Bove M., C; Calvello, M; Cappelletti, D; Colombi, C; Contini, D; de Gennaro, G; Di Gilio, A; Fermo, P; Ferrero, L; Gianelle, V; Giugliano, M; Ielpo, P; Lonati, G; Marinoni, A; Massabò, D; Molteni, U; Moroni, B; Pavese, G; Perrino, C; Perrone, M; Perrone, M; Putaud, J; Sargolini, T; Vecchi, R; Gilardoni, S
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/134841
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