Motor resonance (MR) involves the activation of matching motor representations while observing others' actions. Recent research has shown that such a phenomenon is likely to be influenced by higher order variables such as social factors (e.g., ethnic group membership). The present study investigates whether and how the perception of a social threat elicited by an outgroup member and by contextual cues can modulate motor responses while an individual observes others' movements. In an experimental study based on an action observation paradigm, we asked participants to provide answers through computer mouse movements (MouseTracker). We manipulated the agents' group membership (ingroup vs. outgroup) and the social valence of the objects present in a context (neutral vs. threatening) to elicit social menace through contextual cues. Response times and computer mouse trajectories were recorded. The results show a higher level of MR (i.e., participants started to respond earlier and were faster at responding) when observing an action performed by the ingroup members rather than by the outgroup members only when threatening objects are present in a given context. Participants seem to resonate better with their ingroup; conversely, the outgroup member movements tend to delay motor responses. Therefore, we extend prior research going beyond the general ingroup bias effect on MR and showing that the interaction between membership and contextual cues is likely to elicit threat-related stereotypes. Practical implications of these findings are discussed.

Capellini, R., Sacchi, S., Ricciardelli, P., & Actis-Grosso, R. (2016). Social threat and motor resonance: When a menacing outgroup delays motor response. FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY, 7 [10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01697].

Social threat and motor resonance: When a menacing outgroup delays motor response

CAPELLINI, ROBERTA
Primo
;
SACCHI, SIMONA
Secondo
;
RICCIARDELLI, PAOLA
Penultimo
;
ACTIS GROSSO, ROSSANA
Ultimo
2016

Abstract

Motor resonance (MR) involves the activation of matching motor representations while observing others' actions. Recent research has shown that such a phenomenon is likely to be influenced by higher order variables such as social factors (e.g., ethnic group membership). The present study investigates whether and how the perception of a social threat elicited by an outgroup member and by contextual cues can modulate motor responses while an individual observes others' movements. In an experimental study based on an action observation paradigm, we asked participants to provide answers through computer mouse movements (MouseTracker). We manipulated the agents' group membership (ingroup vs. outgroup) and the social valence of the objects present in a context (neutral vs. threatening) to elicit social menace through contextual cues. Response times and computer mouse trajectories were recorded. The results show a higher level of MR (i.e., participants started to respond earlier and were faster at responding) when observing an action performed by the ingroup members rather than by the outgroup members only when threatening objects are present in a given context. Participants seem to resonate better with their ingroup; conversely, the outgroup member movements tend to delay motor responses. Therefore, we extend prior research going beyond the general ingroup bias effect on MR and showing that the interaction between membership and contextual cues is likely to elicit threat-related stereotypes. Practical implications of these findings are discussed.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Action observation; Intergroup relations; Motor resonance; MouseTracker; Social threat;
social threat, motor resonance, action observation, intergroup relations, MouseTracker
English
Capellini, R., Sacchi, S., Ricciardelli, P., & Actis-Grosso, R. (2016). Social threat and motor resonance: When a menacing outgroup delays motor response. FRONTIERS IN PSYCHOLOGY, 7 [10.3389/fpsyg.2016.01697].
Capellini, R; Sacchi, S; Ricciardelli, P; ACTIS GROSSO, R
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/134585
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