Background Resorbable anchors are widely used in arthroscopic stabilization of the shoulder as a means of soft tissue fixation to bone. Their function is to ensure repair stability until they are replaced by host tissue. Complications include inflammatory soft tissue reactions, cyst formation, screw fragmentation in the joint, osteolytic reactions, and enhanced glenoid rim susceptibility to fracture. Purpose To evaluate resorption of biodegradable screws and determine whether they induce formation of areas with poor bone strength that may lead to glenoid rim fracture even with minor trauma. Study Design Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods This study evaluated 12 patients with anterior shoulder instability who had undergone arthroscopic stabilization with the Bankart technique and various resorbable anchors and subsequently experienced redislocation. The maximum interval between arthroscopic stabilization and the new dislocation was 52 months (mean, 22.16 months; range, 12-52 months). The mean patient age was 31.6 years (range, 17-61 years). The persistence or resorption of anchor holes; the number, area, and volume of osteolytic lesions; and glenoid erosion/fracture were assessed using computed tomography scans taken after redislocation occurred. Results Complete screw resorption was never documented. Osteolytic lesions were found at all sites (mean diameter, 5.64 mm; mean depth, 8.09 mm; mean area, 0.342 cm2; mean volume, 0.345 cm3), and all exceeded anchor size. Anterior glenoid rim fracture was seen in 9 patients, even without high-energy traumas (75% of all recurrences). Conclusion Arthroscopic stabilization with resorbable devices is a highly reliable procedure that is, however, not devoid of complications. In all 12 patients, none of the different implanted anchors had degraded completely, even in patients with longer follow-up, and all induced formation of osteolytic areas. Such reaction may lead to anterior glenoid rim fracture according to the literature and as found in 75% of the study patients with local osteolysis (9/12). Reducing anchor number and/or size may reduce the risk of osteolytic areas and anterior glenoid rim fracture.

Augusti, C., Paladini, P., Campi, F., Merolla, G., Bigoni, M., Porcellini, G. (2015). Anterior Glenoid Rim Fracture Following Use of Resorbable Devices for Glenohumeral Stabilization. ORTHOPAEDIC JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, 3(6) [10.1177/2325967115586559].

Anterior Glenoid Rim Fracture Following Use of Resorbable Devices for Glenohumeral Stabilization

AUGUSTI, CARLO ALBERTO
Primo
;
PALADINI, PAOLO
Secondo
;
BIGONI, MARCO
Penultimo
;
2015

Abstract

Background Resorbable anchors are widely used in arthroscopic stabilization of the shoulder as a means of soft tissue fixation to bone. Their function is to ensure repair stability until they are replaced by host tissue. Complications include inflammatory soft tissue reactions, cyst formation, screw fragmentation in the joint, osteolytic reactions, and enhanced glenoid rim susceptibility to fracture. Purpose To evaluate resorption of biodegradable screws and determine whether they induce formation of areas with poor bone strength that may lead to glenoid rim fracture even with minor trauma. Study Design Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods This study evaluated 12 patients with anterior shoulder instability who had undergone arthroscopic stabilization with the Bankart technique and various resorbable anchors and subsequently experienced redislocation. The maximum interval between arthroscopic stabilization and the new dislocation was 52 months (mean, 22.16 months; range, 12-52 months). The mean patient age was 31.6 years (range, 17-61 years). The persistence or resorption of anchor holes; the number, area, and volume of osteolytic lesions; and glenoid erosion/fracture were assessed using computed tomography scans taken after redislocation occurred. Results Complete screw resorption was never documented. Osteolytic lesions were found at all sites (mean diameter, 5.64 mm; mean depth, 8.09 mm; mean area, 0.342 cm2; mean volume, 0.345 cm3), and all exceeded anchor size. Anterior glenoid rim fracture was seen in 9 patients, even without high-energy traumas (75% of all recurrences). Conclusion Arthroscopic stabilization with resorbable devices is a highly reliable procedure that is, however, not devoid of complications. In all 12 patients, none of the different implanted anchors had degraded completely, even in patients with longer follow-up, and all induced formation of osteolytic areas. Such reaction may lead to anterior glenoid rim fracture according to the literature and as found in 75% of the study patients with local osteolysis (9/12). Reducing anchor number and/or size may reduce the risk of osteolytic areas and anterior glenoid rim fracture.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
devices; resorbable; shoulder; stabilization;
devices; resorbable; shoulder; stabilization
English
Augusti, C., Paladini, P., Campi, F., Merolla, G., Bigoni, M., Porcellini, G. (2015). Anterior Glenoid Rim Fracture Following Use of Resorbable Devices for Glenohumeral Stabilization. ORTHOPAEDIC JOURNAL OF SPORTS MEDICINE, 3(6) [10.1177/2325967115586559].
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10281/128403
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