Objective: Use of external ventricular drains and lumbar catheters is associated with a risk of ventriculitis and meningitis ranging from 2% to 24% because of lack of standardized diagnostic criteria. We evaluated the prevalence of ventriculitis or meningitis in 13 Italian ICUs. Design: Multicenter, prospective study. Setting: Thirteen Italian ICUs. Patients: Two hundred seventy-one patients (mean age, 57 yr) receiving a total number of 311 catheters. Two hundred fifty patients (92.2%) had an external ventricular drain, 17 patients (6.3%) had a lumbar catheter, and four patients (1.5%) had both external ventricular drain and lumbar catheter. Interventions: ICUs enrolled at least 10 consecutive adult patients with an external ventricular drain or lumbar catheter in place for more than 24 hours. Confirmed cerebrospinal fluid infection was defined by presence of a positive cerebrospinal fluid culture, a cerebrospinal fluid/blood glucose ratio less than 0.5, a neutrophilic cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis (> 5 cells/?L), and fever. Abnormal cerebrospinal fluid findings with negative cultures were defined as suspected infection. Measurements and Main Results: Median duration of device use was 13 days (interquartile range, 8-19). Fifteen patients (5.5%) had a confirmed ventriculitis or meningitis, and 15 patients (5.5%) had a suspected ventriculitis or meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid glucose and cerebrospinal fluid/blood glucose ratio were lower in patients with confirmed ventriculitis or meningitis and suspected ventriculitis or meningitis; proteins and lactates were significantly higher in confirmed ventriculitis or meningitis. Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria were equally cultured. Risk factors for infection were a concomitant extracranial infection (odds ratio, 2.34; 95% CI, 1.01-5.40; p = 0.05) and placement of catheters outside the operation room (odds ratio, 4.01; 95% CI, 0.98-16.50; p = 0.05). Conclusions: Ventriculitis or meningitis remains a problem in Italian ICUs, and a strategy for reducing the prevalence is worth planning.

Citerio, G., Signorini, L., Bronco, A., Vargiolu, A., Rota, M., & Latronico, N. (2015). External Ventricular and Lumbar Drain Device Infections in ICU Patients: A Prospective Multicenter Italian Study. CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE, 43(8), 1630-1637 [10.1097/CCM.0000000000001019].

External Ventricular and Lumbar Drain Device Infections in ICU Patients: A Prospective Multicenter Italian Study

CITERIO, GIUSEPPE
Primo
;
BRONCO, ALFIO;VARGIOLU, ALESSIA;ROTA, MATTEO
Penultimo
;
2015

Abstract

Objective: Use of external ventricular drains and lumbar catheters is associated with a risk of ventriculitis and meningitis ranging from 2% to 24% because of lack of standardized diagnostic criteria. We evaluated the prevalence of ventriculitis or meningitis in 13 Italian ICUs. Design: Multicenter, prospective study. Setting: Thirteen Italian ICUs. Patients: Two hundred seventy-one patients (mean age, 57 yr) receiving a total number of 311 catheters. Two hundred fifty patients (92.2%) had an external ventricular drain, 17 patients (6.3%) had a lumbar catheter, and four patients (1.5%) had both external ventricular drain and lumbar catheter. Interventions: ICUs enrolled at least 10 consecutive adult patients with an external ventricular drain or lumbar catheter in place for more than 24 hours. Confirmed cerebrospinal fluid infection was defined by presence of a positive cerebrospinal fluid culture, a cerebrospinal fluid/blood glucose ratio less than 0.5, a neutrophilic cerebrospinal fluid pleocytosis (> 5 cells/?L), and fever. Abnormal cerebrospinal fluid findings with negative cultures were defined as suspected infection. Measurements and Main Results: Median duration of device use was 13 days (interquartile range, 8-19). Fifteen patients (5.5%) had a confirmed ventriculitis or meningitis, and 15 patients (5.5%) had a suspected ventriculitis or meningitis. Cerebrospinal fluid glucose and cerebrospinal fluid/blood glucose ratio were lower in patients with confirmed ventriculitis or meningitis and suspected ventriculitis or meningitis; proteins and lactates were significantly higher in confirmed ventriculitis or meningitis. Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria were equally cultured. Risk factors for infection were a concomitant extracranial infection (odds ratio, 2.34; 95% CI, 1.01-5.40; p = 0.05) and placement of catheters outside the operation room (odds ratio, 4.01; 95% CI, 0.98-16.50; p = 0.05). Conclusions: Ventriculitis or meningitis remains a problem in Italian ICUs, and a strategy for reducing the prevalence is worth planning.
Articolo in rivista - Articolo scientifico
Scientifica
Blood Glucose; Catheters; Cerebral Ventriculitis; Cerebrospinal Fluid; Critical Care; Drainage; Female; Humans; Intensive Care Units; Male; Meningitis; Middle Aged; Prospective Studies
English
Citerio, G., Signorini, L., Bronco, A., Vargiolu, A., Rota, M., & Latronico, N. (2015). External Ventricular and Lumbar Drain Device Infections in ICU Patients: A Prospective Multicenter Italian Study. CRITICAL CARE MEDICINE, 43(8), 1630-1637 [10.1097/CCM.0000000000001019].
Citerio, G; Signorini, L; Bronco, A; Vargiolu, A; Rota, M; Latronico, N
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/103037
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