The tidal disruption of stars by (super-)massive black holes in galactic nuclei has been discussed in theoretical terms for about 30 years but only in the past decade have we been able to detect such events in substantial numbers. Thus, we are now starting to carry out observational tests of models for the disruption. We are also formulating expectations for the inspiral and disruption of white dwarfs by “intermediate-mass” black holes with masses ∼< 105 M☉. Such events are very rich with information and open a new window to intermediate-mass black holes, thought to live in dwarf galaxies and star clusters. They can inform us of the demographics of intermediate-mass black holes, stellar populations and dynamics in their immediate vicinity, and the physics of accretion of hydrogen-deficient material. The combination of upcoming transient surveys using ground-based, electromagnetic observatories and low-frequency gravitational wave observations is ideal for exploiting tidal disruptions of white dwarfs. The detection rate of gravitational wave signals, optimistically, may reach a few dozen per year in a volume up to z ≈ 0.1. Gravitational wave observations are particularly useful because they yield the masses of the objects involved and allow determination of the spin of the black hole, affording tests of physical models for black hole formation and growth. They also give us advance warning of the electromagnetic flares by weeks or more. The right computing infrastructure for modern models for the disruption process and event rates will allow us to make the most of the upcoming observing facilities.

Eracleous, M., Gezari, S., Sesana, A., Bogdanovic, T., Macleod, M., Roth, N., et al. (2019). An arena for multi-messenger astrophysics: Inspiral and tidal disruption of white dwarfs by massive black holes [Altro].

An arena for multi-messenger astrophysics: Inspiral and tidal disruption of white dwarfs by massive black holes

Sesana A.;
2019

Abstract

The tidal disruption of stars by (super-)massive black holes in galactic nuclei has been discussed in theoretical terms for about 30 years but only in the past decade have we been able to detect such events in substantial numbers. Thus, we are now starting to carry out observational tests of models for the disruption. We are also formulating expectations for the inspiral and disruption of white dwarfs by “intermediate-mass” black holes with masses ∼< 105 M☉. Such events are very rich with information and open a new window to intermediate-mass black holes, thought to live in dwarf galaxies and star clusters. They can inform us of the demographics of intermediate-mass black holes, stellar populations and dynamics in their immediate vicinity, and the physics of accretion of hydrogen-deficient material. The combination of upcoming transient surveys using ground-based, electromagnetic observatories and low-frequency gravitational wave observations is ideal for exploiting tidal disruptions of white dwarfs. The detection rate of gravitational wave signals, optimistically, may reach a few dozen per year in a volume up to z ≈ 0.1. Gravitational wave observations are particularly useful because they yield the masses of the objects involved and allow determination of the spin of the black hole, affording tests of physical models for black hole formation and growth. They also give us advance warning of the electromagnetic flares by weeks or more. The right computing infrastructure for modern models for the disruption process and event rates will allow us to make the most of the upcoming observing facilities.
Altro
Si
Scientifica
Astro2020 science white paper
gravitational waves, tidal disruptions, multimessenger astronomy
English
White Paper no. 16, submitted on Feb 18, 2019 to Astro2020 (2020 Decadal Survey on Astronomy and Astrophyscs)
Eracleous, M., Gezari, S., Sesana, A., Bogdanovic, T., Macleod, M., Roth, N., et al. (2019). An arena for multi-messenger astrophysics: Inspiral and tidal disruption of white dwarfs by massive black holes [Altro].
Eracleous, M; Gezari, S; Sesana, A; Bogdanovic, T; Macleod, M; Roth, N; Dai, L; Coleman Miller, M; Tomsick, J
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: http://hdl.handle.net/10281/290691
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